Solar Capitalist LLC Blog

Tag: amperage

Basic Electrical Theory Refresher

by on Feb.11, 2012, under E Basics

Refreshing our minds with Basic Electrical Theory will no doubt be of benefit to those considering the use of solar power – photovoltaics (PV).

First, we’ll review some terminology…

Voltage (V) is the the “potential” difference between two points.

Amperage (I) is the amount of electrical energy flowing.

Resistance (R) is a measure of the degree to which the flow of electric current is opposed.

Ohm’s Law states that the current through a conductor between two points is directly proportional to the potential difference across the two points.

I = V/R, or V = IR, where I is the current through the conductor in units of amperes, V is the potential difference measured across the conductor in units of volts, and R is the resistance of the conductor in units of ohms.

Electrical Polarity (positive and negative) is present in every electrical circuit.

In a Direct Current (DC) circuit, one pole is always negative, the other pole is always positive and the electrons flow in one direction only.

Series vs. Parallel Wiring of Power Sources

Although each battery, solar cell, panel or module has a rated voltage and amperage, they can be wired together in such a manner as to obtain varying results.

Series Circuits / Series Wiring or Connection of Power Sources

A “series circuit” is one in which the circuit components are connected “end-to-end” providing a single path for the flow of current through all the components.

Series wiring (or connection) of power sources is accomplished by connecting the (+) “positive” of one power source to the (-) “negative” of the next.

Wiring power sources in series will result in increased voltage.  When power sources are wired in series, the voltages are additive.  Power sources wired in series will provide a total voltage equal to the sum of voltages of each individual power source.

Wiring power sources in series does not result in increased amperage.  A series circuit will have the same current throughout the circuit.

Parallel Circuits / Parallel Wiring or Connection of Power Sources

A “parallel circuit” is one in which two or more circuit components are connected like rungs of a ladder, providing separate paths for current through each of the components.

Parallel wiring (or connection) of power sources is accomplished by connecting the (+) “positive” leads of the power sources together…and then (-) “negative” leads with each other.

Wiring power sources in parallel will result in increased amperage.  When power sources are wired in parallel, the currents (amperages) are additive.  Power sources wired in parallel will provide a total current (amperage) equal to the sum of currents (amperages) of each individual power source.

Wiring power sources in parallel does not result in increased voltage.  A parallel circuit will have the same voltage throughout the circuit.

Contact Ray Bowers via call or text at: 302-562-1706 or email at: solaray@solarcapitalist.com

These and other products are available via our ecommerce store at: www.solarcapitalist.com

We offer a Blog specific to the topic of SAE 2 Pin Connectors at: www.sae2pin.com

We also invite you to visit our Bohemian Biker LLC blog  www.bohemianbiker.com for additional posts and comments of interest.

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